Daily Archives: March 28, 2019

Jesus Tried Before Pilate

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 Image result for verses in pictures about Jesus before pilateImage result for verses in pictures about Jesus before pilate
 Image result for verses in pictures about Jesus before pilateImage result for verses in pictures about Jesus before pilate
 Image result for verses in pictures about Jesus before pilateImage result for verses in pictures about Jesus before pilate

Jesus Before Pilate

By: Freddy Fritz

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Jesus was betrayed by Judas and arrested by the religious authorities in the Garden of Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives. He was taken to the high priest’s house where Peter denied knowing him three times before the rooster crowed. Then Jesus was subjected to a religious trial before the Jewish Sanhedrin where he was found “guilty” of blasphemy. But since it was not lawful for the Jews to put anyone to death (John 18:31), they sent Jesus to Pilate for a civil trial.

Kent Hughes summarizes what happened next, “A political trial under secular Roman authority and law was necessary. Thus came the most infamous trial in history, a weird, twisted thing that began before Pilate, the careerist Roman politician, then detoured to the tetrarch Herod, the half-Jew puppet ruler, and finally returned to Pilate where the awful judgment was rendered.”

Let’s read about Jesus before Pilate in Luke 23:1-12:

1 Then the whole company of them arose and brought him before Pilate. 2 And they began to accuse him, saying, “We found this man misleading our nation and forbidding us to give tribute to Caesar, and saying that he himself is Christ, a king.” 3 And Pilate asked him, “Are you the King of the Jews?” And he answered him, “You have said so.” 4 Then Pilate said to the chief priests and the crowds, “I find no guilt in this man.” 5 But they were urgent, saying, “He stirs up the people, teaching throughout all Judea, from Galilee even to this place.”

6 When Pilate heard this, he asked whether the man was a Galilean. 7 And when he learned that he belonged to Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent him over to Herod, who was himself in Jerusalem at that time. 8 When Herod saw Jesus, he was very glad, for he had long desired to see him, because he had heard about him, and he was hoping to see some sign done by him. 9 So he questioned him at some length, but he made no answer. 10 The chief priests and the scribes stood by, vehemently accusing him. 11 And Herod with his soldiers treated him with contempt and mocked him. Then, arraying him in splendid clothing, he sent him back to Pilate. 12 And Herod and Pilate became friends with each other that very day, for before this they had been at enmity with each other. (Luke 23:1-12)

Introduction

On Friday, April 15, 2016 a judge vacated the murder conviction of 76-year-old Jack McCullough. A prosecutor says McCullough was wrongly convicted in the 1957 killing of an Illinois schoolgirl. This means that one of the oldest cold cases to be tried in U.S. history has officially gone cold again.

McCullough was sentenced to life in prison in 2012 for the death of 7-year-old Maria Ridulph in Sycamore, about 70 miles west of Chicago. In a review of documents last year, a prosecutor found evidence that supported the former policeman’s long-held alibi that he was 40 miles away in Rockford at the time of Maria’s disappearance.

The Illinois judicial system worked well to free an innocent man who had been wrongly convicted of a crime.

Jesus was innocent of any crime. He had never ever done anything wrong in his entire life. And yet, the Jewish authorities wanted Jesus sentenced to death. But, because they were not able to impose the death penalty on anyone, they had to get the Romans to convict Jesus of a capital offense, and thereby get him sentenced to death.

 

Jesus Before Pilate

From: All about Jesus Christ

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QUESTION: Jesus before Pilate – Did He get a fair trial? 

ANSWER: 

The trial of Jesus before Pilate couldn’t be fair, because the trials responsible for hailing Him before the Governor were models of vindictive injustice. That old court-intriguer Annas intended to execute on Christ the sentence his son-in-law Caiphas had pronounced (John 11:49-505318:12-13). Jesus met those absurdities with stony silence, broken only when put under oath by Caiphas (Matthew 26:62-64).

The trial of Jesus before Pilate couldn’t be fair because the Governor not only didn’t allow defense witnesses to speak, but didn’t immediately dismiss the proceedings when the Jewish leaders refused to offer evidence to support the death sentence they demanded (John 18:28-31). This forced them into the specious charge that Jesus subverted Israel, opposed taxes to Caesar and claimed to be Christ (Luke 23:2). 

The trial of Jesus before Pilate couldn’t be fair because, after personally interrogating Jesus, Pilate decided he posed no threat to Rome and declared Him innocent. Again, Jesus showed His contempt for the charges against Him by a silence that astonished the Governor (Luke 23:3-4Mark 15:3-5.) This was all very remarkable since Pilate hated Jewish kings, yet concluded that Jesus was a king, but pronounced Him innocent of the charges preferred! Still, after making that decision, and after having Jesus returned from examination by Herod Antipas an innocent man (Luke 23:7-15), Pilate determined to punish the Lord, then let him go. 

The trial of Jesus before Pilate couldn’t be fair because Pilate’s fear of the Jews led him to seek a scapegoat for their hatred (Matthew 27:15-18). Since he had already declared Jesus innocent, Pilate needed only to be faithful to his office and responsibility. But he had made his way in politics by giving everyone something, and no one everything, and felt that would satisfy this crisis. As it happened, his ruse to get Barabbas put in Christ’s place backfired. A most fateful interruption occurred when his wife’s appeal on Christ’s behalf (Matthew 27:19) stole the initiative from Pilate and gave it back to the leaders (Matthew 27:20). When they demanded Barabbas, Pilate again tried to escape their fury by actually beating Christ. That satisfied his sense of justice and hoped it would placate their fierce hate. With that kind of mentality in place, who could ever hope to be justly tried? 

Having dealt with mob violence, Pilate could have ordered his soldiers to slaughter any number of the Jews to restore order. He had previously committed such outrages in Jerusalem (Luke 13:1). He had reason on this occasion, but refused. Why? Because cowardice always acts irrationally. It resorts to violence when reason would achieve its goals, and to reason when only force will. 

The trial of Jesus before Pilate couldn’t be fair because Pilate washed his hands to cleanse what he knew was an unforgivable breach of justice in his court (Matthew 27:24). If he had controlled his own court, with the troops available to him, and the authority of Caesar behind him, he wouldn’t have had to resort to such self-justifying behavior. 

The trial of Jesus before Pilate couldn’t be fair because the Governor took the safe way out by having a sign printed and nailed to Christ’s cross: “JESUS OF NAZARETH, THE KING OF THE JEWS” (John 19:19). True; it revealed his real feelings, though expressed inappropriately at the wrong time. He believed the words; no doubt. He came to that conclusion during those fateful hours with Jesus; no doubt. But Pilate lacked the courage to say it when it would have proved him a real man; and declared it when its publication proved him a miserable politician. He let the Jewish menace to his relationship with Caesar (John 19:12), force his abdication of the authority Caesar granted him; then publicly re-asserted it once the threat passed. When you have built your life around accommodation in everyday events, it’s nearly impossible to suddenly find one’s integrity in a crisis.