Tag Archives: rest

Keep Your Dream

 

Keep your dream

From: Academictips.org.

I have a friend named Monty Roberts who owns a horse ranch in San Ysidro. He has let me use his house to put on fund-raising events to raise money for youth at risk programs.

The last time I was there he introduced me by saying, “I want to tell you why I let Jack use my horse. It all goes back to a story about a young man who was the son of an itinerant horse trainer who would go from stable to stable, race track to race track, farm to farm and ranch to ranch, training horses. As a result, the boy’s high school career was continually interrupted. When he was a senior, he was asked to write a paper about what he wanted to be and do when he grew up.

“That night he wrote a seven-page paper describing his goal of someday owning a horse ranch. He wrote about his dream in great detail and he even drew a diagram of a 200-acre ranch, showing the location of all the buildings, the stables and the track. Then he drew a detailed floor plan for a 4,000-square-foot house that would sit on a 200-acre dream ranch.

“He put a great deal of his heart into the project and the next day he handed it in to his teacher. Two days later he received his paper back. On the front page was a large red F with a note that read, `See me after class.’

“The boy with the dream went to see the teacher after class and asked, `Why did I receive an F?’

“The teacher said, `This is an unrealistic dream for a young boy like you. You have no money. You come from an itinerant family. You have no resources. Owning a horse ranch requires a lot of money. You have to buy the land. You have to pay for the original breeding stock and later you’ll have to pay large stud fees. There’s no way you could ever do it.’ Then the teacher added, `If you will rewrite this paper with a more realistic goal, I will reconsider your grade.’

“The boy went home and thought about it long and hard. He asked his father what he should do. His father said, `Look, son, you have to make up your own mind on this. However, I think it is a very important decision for you.’ “Finally, after sitting with it for a week, the boy turned in the same paper, making no changes at all.

He stated, “You can keep the F and I’ll keep my dream.”

Monty then turned to the assembled group and said, “I tell you this story because you are sitting in my 4,000-square-foot house in the middle of my 200-acre horse ranch. I still have that school paper framed over the fireplace.” He added, “The best part of the story is that two summers ago that same schoolteacher brought 30 kids to camp out on my ranch for a week.” When the teacher was leaving, he said, “Look, Monty, I can tell you this now. When I was your teacher, I was something of a dream stealer. During those years I stole a lot of kids’ dreams. Fortunately you had enough gumption not to give up on yours.”

“Don’t let anyone steal your dreams. Follow your heart, no matter what.”

– Author Unknown

 

Are You Ready To Be Poured Out As an Offering? (2)

From: My Utmost For His Highest

I am already being poured out as a drink offering . . . —2 Timothy 4:6

Are you ready to be poured out as an offering? It is an act of your will, not your emotions. Tell God you are ready to be offered as a sacrifice for Him. Then accept the consequences as they come, without any complaints, in spite of what God may send your way. God sends you through a crisis in private, where no other person can help you. From the outside your life may appear to be the same, but the difference is taking place in your will. Once you have experienced the crisis in your will, you will take no thought of the cost when it begins to affect you externally. If you don’t deal with God on the level of your will first, the result will be only to arouse sympathy for yourself.“Bind the sacrifice with cords to the horns of the altar” (Psalm 118:27). You must be willing to be placed on the altar and go through the fire; willing to experience what the altar represents-burning, purification, and separation for only one purpose-the elimination of every desire and affection not grounded in or directed toward God. But you don’t eliminate it, God does. You “bind the sacrifice . . . to the horns of the altar” and see to it that you don’t wallow in self-pity once the fire begins. After you have gone through the fire, there will be nothing that will be able to trouble or depress you. When another crisis arises, you will realize that things cannot touch you as they used to do. What fire lies ahead in your life?

Tell God you are ready to be poured out as an offering, and God will prove Himself to be all you ever dreamed He would be.

 

Pizza Box Evangelist

From: Ourdailyjourney.org.

1 Thessalonians 1:1-10
Now the word of the Lord is ringing out from you to people everywhere (1 Thessalonians 1:8).

Read 1 Corinthians 2:4-5 and see where true power is found in our witness for Jesus.

With whom will you share your faith today? Why are new believers in Jesus so naturally willing to share what God has done for them?

My wife and I were downtown trying to start spiritual conversations with people we met. We came across a 23-year-old street dweller and shared the gospel with him using a method called The Big Story. It involves drawing circles to explain God’s story and plan of salvation. The young man had a pizza box at his feet as he sat on a street bench, so I drew on it as I explained the good news. God moved in his heart and he received Jesus as his Savior! What’s more, later we saw him sharing the circles on the box with a man who had joined him on the bench. Then, not long afterward, the new believer in Jesus was showing them toanother person.

When Paul wrote to the believers in the church of Thessalonica, he commended them for their “faithful work, . . . loving deeds, . . . and the enduring hope” they possessed because of what Jesus had done in their hearts (1 Thessalonians 1:3). Paul, Silas, and Timothy had brought them the gospel, and they had received “the message with joy” (1 Thessalonians 1:1,5-6). This was a beautiful thing on its own, but then the new converts began spreading the word. The apostle wrote, “Now the word of the Lord is ringing out from you to people everywhere . . . for wherever we go we find people telling us about your faith in God” (1 Thessalonians 1:8). They were living out true faith in Jesus and passionately presenting His message (1 Thessalonians 1:9-10).

As you take time today to share Jesus with a co-worker or with that stranger on the bus, the Holy Spirit just might lead them to salvation and subsequently to share their faith with others. Who knows, you might witness the launching of a pizza box evangelist!

My Cabin Rules

By: Pamela M. Steiner  http://pamelasopenwindow.blogspot.com/2013/09/my-cabin-rules.html

 

This time of year I always get “cabin fever”.  No, not in the stuck in the cabin with no place to go trapped and feeling desperate kind of “cabin fever”, but the kind of “cabin fever” that yearns and longs to have a cabin to actually go to and become “trapped inside” for the whole autumn and winter…THAT kind of “cabin fever”.

 

Yeah, I’ve told you about my dream of having a little cabin someday: http://pamelasopenwindow.blogspot.com/2012/10/my-little-secret-hideaway-dream.html…and if you ever go to my Pinterest Page for “Little Cabins, Porches,Swings, Birdhouses, etc.”, you will see all of my little dream visions for cabins, porches, porch swings, etc. that I have pinned and drooled over.  It’s my favorite little place to go to and at least visualize what I’d love to have in a cabin someday if I ever get the chance.

 

One of the cute little signs I discovered on Pinterest is this “My Cabin Rules” sign:

 

This kind of sums up exactly what I want to do at my little cabin in the woods…and what I would want my guests to do if they ever came to visit.

 

Actually, there really isn’t any reason why we can’t do that right here and now. I already live in the woods. My house isn’t exactly a cabin, but it is rather ‘campy’.  So here’s my response to the “Cabin Rules”:

 

1.  Take Time to Relax:  Thankfully I have just recently been able to readjust my work schedule so that I can have Fridays off. I cannot begin to tell you how much that has helped me to relax more. Having that one extra day to be totally unscheduled is the best tonic I’ve ever taken. Unbelievable how wonderful that is. (I am writing this in the evening of one of my Fridays off…can you tell?)

 

2.  Don’t feed the bears:   We do have bears…and we try not to feed them. Sometimes they just help themselves to whatever they can find…like my birdfeeders when I forget to bring them inside before dark…and sometimes in the broad daylight.

 

 

3.  Look at the Stars:  Yep, I’ve done that too. Click this for the story.  The stars are so much brighter here with no city lights to steal the show.

 

4.  Feel the cool breezes:  Well…right now it’s about 90 degrees in the evening…the cool breezes haven’t arrived yet, but I am sitting in front of my fan and it feels pretty cool.  The cool breezes will come…I have felt  wisps of them early in the morning as I take my walk…and even in the early evening….they tease us with the promise of cooler days to come.

 

5.  Walk in the woods: Here’s one special walk in the woods.  (click on link)

This is a picture from my most recent walk in the woods this very morning.

(Don’t forget, you can click on each picture to enlarge it for viewing!)

 

And these little bear tracks are also from my
walk in the woods this morning!

 

 

 

The beginning of the trail today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.  Listen to the trees:

 

 

 

I wish you could hear the whispering of these trees in the wind…they really do sound like they are talking to us…

 

7.  Build Campfires:

 

Yep!! We do that too.

 

 

8.  Discover Time:

Sit a spell…listen to the birds.

 

 

9.  Smell the Fresh Air:

 

 Early morning sunshine…doesn’t get any fresher than that…do you see the angel?

 

10.  Relish each moment:

 

I suppose what I have learned in this little exercise tonight is that sometimes the dreams we yearn for are already within our grasp…right in front of us…if we’d just open our eyes and look around. Perhaps we need to recognize the wonder and beauty of what God has already given us…and be thankful for such as we have. Then take that to the next level…and share it with others.  Whether it be a cabin in the woods, or a home in the city…or possibly the ability to share positive and happy things with others…through writing, pictures, baked goods, helping those less fortunate or currently in need of physical assistance due to illness or other kind of discomfort. Using the talents we have to bless those around us in one way or another.  Don’t wait until you have everything perfectly lined up…that may never happen. Do what you can now with what you have.  No one is promised tomorrow…live today to the fullest…and share it with someone else.

 

Yep, those are MY Cabin Rules!  Have a blessed day, my friend.

 

 

Wanna go for a walk with me?  Be sure to get here early…wear long pants and

closed toe shoes…bring your camera…and bug spray!

Let’s go!!!

 

 

 

Keep Your Dream

 

Keep your dream

 

I have a friend named Monty Roberts who owns a horse ranch in San Ysidro. He has let me use his house to put on fund-raising events to raise money for youth at risk programs.

The last time I was there he introduced me by saying, “I want to tell you why I let Jack use my horse. It all goes back to a story about a young man who was the son of an itinerant horse trainer who would go from stable to stable, race track to race track, farm to farm and ranch to ranch, training horses. As a result, the boy’s high school career was continually interrupted. When he was a senior, he was asked to write a paper about what he wanted to be and do when he grew up.

“That night he wrote a seven-page paper describing his goal of someday owning a horse ranch. He wrote about his dream in great detail and he even drew a diagram of a 200-acre ranch, showing the location of all the buildings, the stables and the track. Then he drew a detailed floor plan for a 4,000-square-foot house that would sit on a 200-acre dream ranch.

“He put a great deal of his heart into the project and the next day he handed it in to his teacher. Two days later he received his paper back. On the front page was a large red F with a note that read, `See me after class.’

“The boy with the dream went to see the teacher after class and asked, `Why did I receive an F?’

“The teacher said, `This is an unrealistic dream for a young boy like you. You have no money. You come from an itinerant family. You have no resources. Owning a horse ranch requires a lot of money. You have to buy the land. You have to pay for the original breeding stock and later you’ll have to pay large stud fees. There’s no way you could ever do it.’ Then the teacher added, `If you will rewrite this paper with a more realistic goal, I will reconsider your grade.’

“The boy went home and thought about it long and hard. He asked his father what he should do. His father said, `Look, son, you have to make up your own mind on this. However, I think it is a very important decision for you.’ “Finally, after sitting with it for a week, the boy turned in the same paper, making no changes at all.

He stated, “You can keep the F and I’ll keep my dream.”

Monty then turned to the assembled group and said, “I tell you this story because you are sitting in my 4,000-square-foot house in the middle of my 200-acre horse ranch. I still have that school paper framed over the fireplace.” He added, “The best part of the story is that two summers ago that same schoolteacher brought 30 kids to camp out on my ranch for a week.” When the teacher was leaving, he said, “Look, Monty, I can tell you this now. When I was your teacher, I was something of a dream stealer. During those years I stole a lot of kids’ dreams. Fortunately you had enough gumption not to give up on yours.”

“Don’t let anyone steal your dreams. Follow your heart, no matter what.”

– Author Unknown

Source:  Moral Stories, by Academic Tips. org

Late Arrivals Welcome

 

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A Sunday Message From Simposious and Our Daily Bread

Late Arrivals Welcome

 — by Randy Kilgore
Our Daily Bread Radio is hosted by Les Lamborn
I wish to give to this last man the same as to you. —Matthew 20:14
Bible in a Year:
Job 17-19; Acts 10:1-23

 

One night when I visited a nursing home, a resident named Tom slipped out quietly from his room, hoping to catch me to chat. After we talked awhile, he asked, “Won’t God be insulted if I become a Christian this late in life?” Tom’s question wasn’t a surprise. As a chaplain, I often hear it in varying forms from the elderly, from those who struggle with addictions, from former prisoners. They think they have a legitimate reason to believe it’s too late for them to know God or to be used by Him.

Tom and I spent time exploring people in Scripture who, because of their past, could have thought it was too late for them to know God. But Rahab, a prostitute (Josh. 2:12-14; Heb. 11:31), and Zacchaeus, a tax collector (Luke 19:1-8), chose faith in God despite their past.

We also looked at Jesus’ parable of workers in the vineyard (Matt. 20:1-16). The earlier the hire, the more labor they were able to give the vineyard owner (vv.2-7), but those hired later discovered they had equal value in the owner’s eyes and would be rewarded equally (vv.8-16). The vineyard owner chose to be gracious to them all.

No matter our past or present, God longs to show us His grace and bring us into relationship with Him.

Father, we are amazed at Your grace! Thank You that
we can come to You at any time for forgiveness and be
restored to relationship with You. Thank You that we
can now be used by You to touch the lives of others.
To give your life to Christ now is to keep it forever.

Victory: a true adventure short story

 

 

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Victory: a true adventure short story

The delicate spring flowers shyly displayed their new attire as we stepped lightly along the rough stone-filled trail. Butterflies, some golden, some blue, darted in front of us, as if to lead the way.
We had not sensed that this was anything more than a short day hike from Bozeman that early June day. My wife Theresa, daughter Maria, her husband Mark and I drove up Springhill Road north of town to the trailhead overlooking the valley.
Stopping for a break and looking behind us, I was struck by the beauty around us. Snow-capped peaks, bright green spring grass, a couple of tethered horses and two faces under straw western hats peeking from behind a bush; breathtaking indeed. Wait; two faces behind a bush…? Was this a mirage? Not wanting the others to think the elevation was affecting my vision, I remained silent.

Proceeding up the path, we stopped again to observe all that was offered. Quietly looking toward some bushes down the trail, I again saw the outlines of two persons. Okay, we were being followed! Now, informing the others of my discovery, we continued on our trek.

A short climb later brought us to a decision point in our hike. A bubbling spring creek would either have to be waded or crossed on slippery boards, and our decision was to do neither. The area was filled with tall, thick bushes. Near one, crouched down to hide, there were the two, now clearly seen as young; a girl and boy. My instincts told me a game was being played, so why not join in the fun.

As the others visited and rested, I went around the bushes, coming up behind our peeping youngsters. They probably sensed my presence, but didn’t move or talk. Quietly backing away, I joined our group and we headed down the trail.
Our slow meander down the trail was suddenly interrupted by the strangest human sounds.

“Yedda yea woha hoo hoo!” The youngsters kept in back of us and off the trail, but their inarticulate babble filled the crisp clear air. They ran, leapt in graceful ballet-like moves; twisting, jumping and waving branches in the air. “Scroom, gooa goda, yada yada!”…such delightful exchanges as they romped and skipped along the trail’s edge, just far enough back to keep us curious.

Coming upon a sharp dip in the trail, Mark and I crouched down and let Theresa and Maria proceed forward. We held our laughter as our shadow friends got nearer.
“Wambo yedda gitta gotta!” joyfully over the trail and …YIKES! They hastily withdrew after almost running into us. That was close! I silently chuckled at having pulled off the “got cha.”
Our mysterious adventurers were quickly away on horseback, galloping, turning and raising branches with colored bandanas tied to the top as flags. Red flag, yellow flag, “Yedda hoo, wada whoo!”
After having pulled off the “capture,” I now yelled back, “Yea hoo, whoo whew. Gitta gota goo!”

As we reached the parking lot and prepared to leave, we again encountered our mounted youth, near the buck and pole fence separating fantasy from the more conventional life. We decided to give our friends a farewell; now on the count of three, all yell out the windows…”three, two, one…Yadda hoo hoo. Wada Wanny!”

They displayed a last show of power; we, the conquered, were retreating in haste to the safety of the valley below. They raised and pumped their flags high in the air as we drove off. Victory, oh sweet victory!   Bozeman Magazine.

Jerry Schuster lives in Wolf Point, MT with his wife Teresa, where he has practiced law for Forty years. Jerry will be retiring and moving to Bozeman in 2013.

Our Goal…A Full Life

 

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A FULL LIFE

“A boat docked in a tiny Mexican village. An American tourist complimented the Mexican fisherman on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took him to catch them.

“Not very long,” answered the Mexican.

“Well, then, why didn’t you stay out longer and catch more?” asked the American.

The Mexican explained that his small catch was sufficient to meet his needs and those of his family.

The American asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”

“I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, and take a siesta with my wife. In the evenings, I go into the village to see my friends, play the guitar, and sing a few songs. I have a full life.”

The American interrupted, “I have an MBA from Harvard and I can help you! You should start by fishing longer every day. You can then sell the extra fish you catch. With the extra revenue, you can buy a bigger boat.

“With the extra money the larger boat will bring, you can buy a second one and a third one and so on until you have an entire fleet of trawlers. Instead of selling your fish to a middle man, you can negotiate directly with the processing plants and maybe even open your own plant.

“You can then leave this little village and move to Mexico City, Los Angeles, or even New York City! From there you can direct your huge enterprise.”

“How long would that take?” asked the Mexican.

“Twenty, perhaps twenty-five years,” replied the American.

“And after that?”

“Afterwards? That’s when it gets really interesting,” answered the American, laughing. “When your business gets really big, you can start selling stocks and make millions!”

“Millions? Really? And after that?”

“After that you’ll be able to retire, live in a tiny village near the coast, sleep late, play with your children, catch a few fish, take siestas with your wife, and spend your evenings drinking and enjoying your friends.” ( A Full Life, By: Ovidiu Radulescu).

Quotes About Contentment

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Quotes About Contentment

Quotes tagged as “contentment” (showing 1-30 of 194)
Mark Twain

“Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”
― Mark Twain
Dale Carnegie

“It isn’t what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it.”
― Dale CarnegieHow to Win Friends and Influence People
tags: 
Oprah Winfrey

“Be thankful for what you have; you’ll end up having more. If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you will never, ever have enough”
― Oprah Winfrey
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“For after all, the best thing one can do when it is raining is let it rain.”
― Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Martha Washington

“The greater part of our happiness or misery depends upon our dispositions, and not upon our circumstances.”
― Martha Washington
Maya Angelou

“We need much less than we think we need.”
― Maya Angelou
Leo Tolstoy

“A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people to whom it is easy to do good, and who are not accustomed to have it done to them; then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one’s neighbor — such is my idea of happiness.”
― Leo TolstoyFamily Happiness
Lao Tzu

“Be content with what you have;
rejoice in the way things are.
When you realize there is nothing lacking,
the whole world belongs to you.”
― Lao Tzu
Lao Tzu

“Because one believes in oneself, one doesn’t try to convince others. Because one is content with oneself, one doesn’t need others’ approval. Because one accepts oneself, the whole world accepts him or her.”
― Lao Tzu
Walt Whitman

“I have learned that to be with those I like is enough”
― Walt Whitman
Eleanor Roosevelt

“Happiness is not a goal…it’s a by-product of a life well lived.”
― Eleanor Roosevelt
Dr. Seuss

“Just tell yourself, Duckie, you’re real quite lucky.”
― Dr. Seuss
Dorothy Parker

Inventory:“Four be the things I am wiser to know:
Idleness, sorrow, a friend, and a foe.
Four be the things I’d been better without:
Love, curiosity, freckles, and doubt.
Three be the things I shall never attain:
Envy, content, and sufficient champagne.
Three be the things I shall have till I die:
Laughter and hope and a sock in the eye.”
― Dorothy ParkerThe Complete Poems of Dorothy Parker
Elizabeth Gilbert

“At some point, you gotta let go, and sit still, and allow contentment to come to you.”
― Elizabeth GilbertEat, Pray, Love
Socrates

“He who is not contented with what he has, would not be contented with what he would like to have.”
― Socrates
Pearl S. Buck

“Many people lose the small joys in the hope for the big happiness.”
― Pearl S. Buck
Immanuel Kant

“We are not rich by what we possess but by what we can do without.”
― Immanuel Kant