Daily Archives: June 24, 2018

Whatever You Do

I Corinthians 10: 31-33

31  So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.

 32  Do not cause anyone to stumble, whether Jews, Greeks or the church of God

33  even as I try to please everyone in every way. For I am not seeking my own good but the good of many, so that they may be saved.

 

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Whatever You Do

From: Our Daily Journey

Whatever You Do

Read:

John 17:13-19
Just as you sent me into the world, I am sending them into the world (John 17:18).

As my friend and I were talking while she was washing the dishes after dinner, I looked up and noticed a wooden plaque above the sink. Engraved on it were the words of 1 Corinthians 10:31, “So whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.” After I asked her why she chose to display that verse, she told me it reminds her to honor God through every situation, even when she’s washing dishes!

When Jesus began His ministry, He proclaimed the arrival of the kingdom of God (Mark 1:15). He came to free people from sin and death, model a new way of life, and in this way establish God’s kingdom on earth. And this new kingdom way of life included the call for His disciples to “give up your own way, take up your cross daily, and follow me” (Luke 9:23).

God’s kingdom includes every aspect of our lives. As we pledge allegiance to King Jesus, our values and perspectives are transformed. Knowing God’s purposes for our lives changes the way we engage with others.

Realizing we don’t just work to make money, but to serve those around us, gives our work new meaning. We begin to reflect the grace and wisdom of God’s kingdom at the workplace through our actions, attitudes, and relationships. Through Jesus’ leading and power we can serve and love others, a small reflection of all He’s done for us.

Of course, not every employee in the workplace is a believer. But all of us play a part in working for God’s kingdom. In every situation, as the Holy Spirit equips us, we can honor God by loving those around us sacrificially, following the example of Jesus, who “came not to be served but to serve others and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Matthew 20:28).

 

God’s cure for man’s weakness

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By: Charles Spurgeon

‘Out of weakness were made strong.’ Hebrews 11:34

Suggested Further Reading: Hebrews 11:1–7

Faith makes the crown of eternal life glitter before the believer’s eye; it waves before him the palm branch. Sense pictures the grave, loss, suffering, defeat, death, forgetfulness: but faith points to the resurrection, the glorious appearance of the Son of Man, the calling of the saints from every corner of the earth, the clothing of them all in their triumphant array, and the entrance of the blood-washed conquerors into the presence of God with eternal joy. Thus faith makes us out of weakness to become strong. Let me remind you that the essential ingredients of faith’s comfort are just these: faith sees the invisible and beholds the substance of that which is afar off: faith believes in God, a present, powerful God, full of love and wisdom, effecting his decree, accomplishing his purpose, fulfilling his promise, glorifying his Son. Faith believes in the blood of Jesus, in the effectual redemption on the cross, it believes in the power of the Holy Spirit, his might to soften the stone and to put life into the very ribs of death. Faith grasps the reality of the Bible; she does not look upon it as a sepulchre with a stone laid thereon, but as a temple in which Christ reigns, as an ivory palace out of which he comes riding in his chariot, conquering and to conquer. Faith does not believe the gospel to be a worn-out scroll, to be rolled up and put away; she believes that the gospel instead of being in its dotage is in its youth; she anticipates for it a manhood of mighty strugglings, and a grand maturity of blessedness and triumph. Faith does not shirk the fight; she longs for it, because she foresees the victory.

 

The desire of the soul in spiritual darkness

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By: Charles Spurgeon

“With my soul have I desired thee in the night.” Isaiah 26:9

Suggested Further Reading: Psalm 42

There are times when all the saints can do is to desire. We have a vast number of evidences of piety: some are practical, some are experimental, some are doctrinal; and the more evidences a man has of his piety the better, of course. We like a number of signatures, to make a deed more valid, if possible. We like to invest property in a great number of trustees, in order that it may be all the safer; and so we love to have many evidences. Many witnesses will carry our case in the courts better than a few: and so it is well to have many witnesses to testify to our piety. But there are seasons when a Christian cannot get any. He can get scarcely one witness to come and attest his godliness. He asks for good works to come and speak for him. But there will be such a cloud of darkness about him, and his good works will appear so black that he will not dare to think of their evidences. He will say, “True, I hope this is the right fruit; I hope I have served God; but I dare not plead these works as evidences.” He will have lost assurance, and with it his enjoyment of communion with God. “I have had that fellowship with him,” perhaps he will say, and he will summon that communion to come and be in evidence. But he has forgotten it, and it does not come, and Satan whispers it is a fancy, and the poor evidence of communion has its mouth gagged, so that it cannot speak. But there is one witness that very seldom is gagged, and one that I trust the people of God can always apply, even in the night: and that is, “I have desired thee—I have desired thee in the night.”