Daily Archives: July 31, 2021

Is Jesus Knocking on the Door of Your Heart?

Jesus Knocking At The Door Of Your Heart - Novocom.topRevelation 3:20 - The meaning of Jesus knocking on your door
What Revelation 3:20 REALLY Means (Behold, I stand at the door and knock) -Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and  opens the door, I will come in and eat wi… | Revelation 3:20, Revelation 3,  Daily bible verse
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Revelation 3:20 Behold, I'm standing at the door, knocking. If your heart  is open to hear my voice and you open the door within, I will come in to  you and feastRevelation 3:20 Jesus Is Knocking At The Door — Tell the Lord Thank You

 

Is Jesus Knocking on the Door of Your Heart?

Recently, I had a new front door installed on my home. Upon inspecting the door, the contractor asked if I wanted a peephole installed, assuring me it would only take a few extra minutes. While he was busy drilling the hole, I made a quick run to Home Depot to purchase the peephole. For only a few dollars, I’d have the security and comfort of being able to see who was knocking at my door before deciding whether to open it.

After all, a knock on the door by itself tells me nothing about who is standing on the other side, preventing me from making an informed decision. Apparently, making an informed decision was important to Jesus as well. In chapter three in the book of Revelation, we read that Jesus is standing at a door, knocking:

“Behold, I stand at the door and knock; if anyone hears My voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and will dine with him, and he with Me.” Revelation 3:20 (NASB)

While the Scripture is presented as a letter to the church as a whole, in this context, the church is also understood as being comprised of individual souls who each have turned away from God. The apostle Paul teaches us in Romans 3:11 that no one seeks God. Rather, Scripture teaches us that because of His glorious mercy and grace, God seeks us! This is clear in Jesus’s willingness to stand behind the closed door and knock. Therefore, many understand this illustration as being representative of our individual hearts. Either way we look at it, Jesus does not leave the person behind the door wondering who is knocking. As the story continues, we find that Jesus is not only knocking, He is also speaking from the other side, “If any man hears my voice…” Have you ever wondered what Jesus was saying from outside the closed door? The previous verse gives us a bit of a clue as He admonishes the church, “…turn from your indifference.” (Revelation 3:19). And yet, we are still given a choice: even if we hear His voice, He leaves it up to us whether to open the door and invite Him in.

So what happens after we open the door? Does He come barreling in and start pointing out our dirty laundry or rearranging the furniture? Some may not open the door for fear Jesus intends to condemn us for all that is wrong with our lives; however, Scripture makes it clear this is not the case. The verse goes on to explain that Jesus knocks on the door of our heart so that, “…he [will dine] with me.” The NLT says it this way, “we will share a meal together as friends.”

Jesus has come for the relationship. He does not force His way in, or arrive in order to condemn us; rather, Jesus knocks on the door of our heart in order to present a gift – the gift of Himself so that through Him, we may become children of God.

“He came into the very world He created, but the world didn’t recognize Him. He came to his own people, and even they rejected Him. But to all who believed Him and accepted Him, He gave the right to become children of God.” John 1:10-12 (NLT)

 

The meek and lowly One

By: Charles Spurgeon

“Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek, and lowly in heart; and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” Matthew 11:28-30

Suggested Further Reading: Matthew 21:1-17

Christ on earth was a king; but there was nothing about him of the exclusive pomp of kings, which excludes the common people from their society. Look at the eastern king Ahasuerus, sitting on his throne. He is considered by his people as a superior being. None may come in unto the king, unless he is called for. Should he venture to pass the circle, the guards will slay him, unless the king stretches out the golden sceptre. Even Esther, his beloved wife, is afraid to draw near, and must put her life in her hand, if she comes into the presence of the king uncalled. Christ is a king; but where is his pomp? Where the janitor that keeps his door, and thrusts away the poor? Where the soldiers that ride on either side of his chariot to screen the monarch from the sight of poverty? See thy King, O Sion! He comes, he comes in royal pomp! Behold, Judah, behold thy King cometh! But how cometh he? “Meek and lowly, riding upon an ass, and upon a colt, the foal of an ass.” And who are his attendants? See, the young children, boys and girls! They cry, “Hosannah! Hosannah! Hosannah!” And who are they that wait upon him? His poor disciples. They pull the branches from the trees; they cast their garments in the street, and there he rides on—Judah’s royal king. His courtiers are the poor; his pomp is that tribute which grateful hearts delight to offer. O sinners, will you not come to Christ? There is nothing in him to keep you back. You need not say, like Esther did of old, “I will go in unto the king, and if I perish, I perish.” Come and welcome! Come and welcome! Christ is more ready to receive you than you are to come to him. Come to the King!

For meditation: The character of the King should be reflected in the character of his subjects (Matthew 5:3,5,10). 3 John 9,10 describes exactly what is not called for!

 

Today’s Devotions

Morning

July 31

1 Chronicles 29:1 Then King David said to the whole assembly: “My son Solomon, the one whom God has chosen, is young and inexperienced. The task is great, because this palatial structure is not for man but for the LORD God.

David gave, and then he gave some more. The tonnage of precious metals is incredible! And when David asked, “Now, who is willing to consecrate himself today to the LORD?” 1 Chronicles 29:5, the leaders also gave in abundance. The people rejoiced at the willing response of their leaders, for they had given freely and wholeheartedly to the LORD. David the king also rejoiced greatly. 1 Chronicles 29:9 (NIV)Everyone seemed to be totally devoted to making the house of the LORD the most amazing and costly structure ever built.

This passage is a favorite of those raising funds to build new church buildings. Let us never forget that we are speaking of people, living stones, who make up the temple today. The temple Solomon built was a wonderful divinely inspired illustration of what God desires. David referred to it as God’s footstool. The prophet said that heaven is God’s throne and earth His footstool so what kind of house can you build Him? (Acts 7:48) The task is indeed great. In fact, all this gold and silver and precious stones, all the labor of gifted and anointed men could only erect a shadow of the real temple.

The task is great, but now we have the Son of David (Jesus) to do the building. Unlike Solomon, the Son of David is experienced. Will we give of ourselves and our resources to see that the real temple of living stones is built, like they gave to see a passing shadow built? How much more should we be willing to give our treasures and talents to the real task!

Consider: There is surely someone in your life that the Master Builder is transforming into a living stone. How can you give to see the work is completed?

 

Streams in the Desert – July 31

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David cared for them with pure motives; he led them with skill.  Ps 78:72

When you are doubtful as to your course, submit your judgment absolutely to the Spirit of God, and ask Him to shut against you every door but the right one…Meanwhile keep on as you are, and consider the absence of indication to be the indication of God’s will that you are on His track…As you go down the long corridor, you will find that He has preceded you, and locked many doors which you would fain have entered; but be sure that beyond these there is one which He has left unlocked. Open it and enter, and you will find yourself face to face with a bend of the river of opportunity, broader and deeper than anything you had dared to imagine in your sunniest dreams. Launch forth upon it; it conducts to the open sea.

God guides us, often by circumstances. At one moment the way may seem utterly blocked; and then shortly afterward some trivial incident occurs, which might not seem much to others, but which to the keen eye of faith speaks volumes. Sometimes these things are repeated in various ways, in answer to prayer. They are not haphazard results of chance, but the opening up of circumstances in the direction in which we would walk. And they begin to multiply as we advance toward our goal, just as the lights do as we near a populous town, when darting through the land by night express.
—F. B. Meyer

If you go to Him to be guided, He will guide you; but He will not comfort your distrust or half-trust of Him by showing you the chart of all His purposes concerning you. He will show you only into a way where, if you go cheerfully and trustfully forward, He will show you on still farther.
—Horace Bushnell

As moves my fragile bark across the storm-swept sea,
Great waves beat o’er her side, as north wind blows;
Deep in the darkness hid lie threat’ning rocks and shoals;
But all of these, and more, my Pilot knows.

Sometimes when dark the night, and every light gone out,
I wonder to what port my frail ship goes;
Still though the night be long, and restless all my hours,
My distant goal, I’m sure, my Pilot knows.

—Thomas Curtis Clark