Open Spaces

Image result for open spaces picturesImage result for open spaces picturesImage result for open spaces picturesImage result for open spaces picturesImage result for open spaces picturesImage result for open spaces picturesImage result for open spaces picturesImage result for open spaces pictures

Open Spaces

From: Our Daily Journey

Open Spaces

Read:

Exodus 33:1-11
Inside the Tent of Meeting, the Lord would speak to Moses face to face, as one speaks to a friend (Exodus 33:11).

Dr. Richard Swenson in his book Margin writes, “We must have some room to breathe. We need freedom to think and permission to heal. Our relationships are being starved to death by velocity. . . . Our children lay wounded on the ground, run over by our high-speed good intentions. Is God now pro-exhaustion? Doesn’t He lead people beside the still waters anymore? Who plundered those wide-open spaces of the past, and how can we get them back? There are no fallow lands for our emotions to lie down and rest in.”

Does that resonate? We desperately need more open spaces, more quiet moments with God for healing, and restoration. This is something that Moses lived out well. Charged with leading hundreds of thousands of “stubborn and rebellious” people (Exodus 33:5), Moses often withdrew from the challenges of leadership to find rest and guidance in God’s presence. “It was Moses’ practice to take the Tent of Meeting and set it up some distance from camp” (Exodus 33:7). “Inside the Tent of Meeting, the LORD would speak to Moses face to face, as one speaks to a friend” (Exodus 33:11).

Moses made it a practice to meet with God, and he did so away from distraction. And Jesus “often withdrew to the wilderness for prayer” (Luke 5:16). Both He and Moses realized the importance of spending time alone with the Father. And as Moses heard God speak with him as “a friend,” he received the wisdom and help he needed.

We too need to build margin into our lives, some wide and open spaces spent in rest and in God’s presence. Spending time with Him will help us make better decisions—creating healthier margins and boundaries in our life so we have the bandwidth available to love Him and others well.

Let’s seek God in open spaces today.

 

The blind beggar

By: Charles Spurgeon

“And as he went out of Jericho…. blind Bartimaeus…. sat by the highway side begging.” Mark 10:46

Suggested Further Reading: John 9:39-41

To be both blind and poor, these were a combination of the sternest evils. One thinks it is scarcely possible to resist the cry of a beggar whom we meet in the street if he is blind. We pity the blind man when he is surrounded with luxury, but when we see a blind man in want, and following the beggar’s trade in the busy streets, we can hardly forbear stopping to assist him. This case of Bartimaeus, however, is but a picture of our own. We are all by nature blind and poor. It is true we account ourselves able enough to see; but this is just one phase of our blindness. Our blindness is of such a kind that it makes us think our vision perfect; whereas, when we are enlightened by the Holy Spirit, we discover our previous sight to have been blindness indeed. Spiritually, we are blind; we are unable to discern our lost estate; unable to conceive the blackness of sin, or the terrors of the wrath to come. The unrenewed mind is so blind, that it perceives not the all-attractive beauty of Christ; the Sun of righteousness may arise with healing beneath his wings, but this is all in vain for those who cannot see his shining. Christ may do many mighty works in their presence, but they do not recognise his glory; we are blind until he has opened our eyes. But besides being blind we are also by nature poor. Our father Adam spent our birthright, lost our estates. Paradise, the homestead of our race, has become dilapidated, and we are left in the depths of beggary without anything with which we may buy bread for our hungry souls, or clothing for our naked spirits; blindness and beggary are the lot of all men after a spiritual fashion, till Jesus visits them in love.

For meditation: Spiritually the unconverted are very often exactly the opposite of what they think they are. It can also be true of Christians, for better or worse (Revelation 2:93:1,8,17,18).

Prayer in the Father’s House

By Oswald Chambers

Prayer in the Father’s House

Our Lord’s childhood was not immaturity waiting to grow into manhood— His childhood is an eternal fact. Am I a holy, innocent child of God as a result of my identification with my Lord and Savior? Do I look at my life as being in my Father’s house? Is the Son of God living in His Father’s house within me?

The only abiding reality is God Himself, and His order comes to me moment by moment. Am I continually in touch with the reality of God, or do I pray only when things have gone wrong— when there is some disturbance in my life? I must learn to identify myself closely with my Lord in ways of holy fellowship and oneness that some of us have not yet even begun to learn. “…I must be about My Father’s business”— and I must learn to live every moment of my life in my Father’s house.

Think about your own circumstances. Are you so closely identified with the Lord’s life that you are simply a child of God, continually talking to Him and realizing that everything comes from His hands? Is the eternal Child in you living in His Father’s house? Is the grace of His ministering life being worked out through you in your home, your business, and in your circle of friends? Have you been wondering why you are going through certain circumstances? In fact, it is not that you have to go through them. It is because of your relationship with the Son of God who comes, through the providential will of His Father, into your life. You must allow Him to have His way with you, staying in perfect oneness with Him.

The life of your Lord is to become your vital, simple life, and the way He worked and lived among people while here on earth must be the way He works and lives in you.

 

2 thoughts on “Open Spaces

    1. simposiousadmin Post author

      Thank you. Illustration is the hardest part. Finding the right pictures and words
      that back-up the theme. God puts it all together though. He does great work always.
      Thank you for your encouragement. I need encouragement with things being hard now.
      You lift my spirits.

      Sincerely

      John

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *